This is the latest from Foskey Road News, a business blog that is strictly consumer focused.

by Edward Foskey

Based on the life expectancy of the heat pump that came with my house when I bought it, I know that I am already living on borrowed time. I just recently had a minor repair and the semi-annual check-up. My plans are to start preparing to replace it by next spring.

I know that there are some Foskey Road News Readers who will be looking at that decision even before I do, so it is time for looking at what to consider for the upgrade.

First things first, try to have a good idea about the quality of knowledge your HVAC contractor has. Does he know how to size a system properly? Ask him about doing a Manual J on your house at minimum. If you get that deer in the head lights response over the phone or they do not schedule a time to come out and get some measurements on your house first, then call another contractor. Just because you may have had a 3 ton system in your house does not necessarily mean that is the size your house needs.

READ MORE HERE...

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Comment by Edward Foskey on May 17, 2013 at 8:05pm

Gustavo,

Thanks for the input. I agree with you in that I will be waiting till my system's next failure and crossing my fingers that it survives through the summer.

Comment by Gustavo Melo on May 17, 2013 at 7:35pm

Any system that is out of warranty is really a coin toss as to whether it is financially better to repair or replace. I wouldn't pull a 24 year old system that is running fine but I would on its first failure, no question. The article had some good advice for someone looking to purchase a new system. 

Comment by Edward Foskey on May 16, 2013 at 1:01pm

Tom,

Thanks! My heat pump is pushing near that 24 year point. I have no doubt that I can get a system for my house that will be more efficient than my electric bill's current monthly jump of over $100 per during the cooling season.

The "read more here" link was to lead to the rest of my blog on my site. The additional link in my blog (in the third bullet point) led to my page about the Georgia Energy Code and Duct & Envelope Tightness verification requirements with links to those pages.

Thanks for your input.

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