Why is a BPI Building Analyst training an asset?

In order to answer this, let’s have a short recap on what BPI stands for. The Building Performance Institute, or BPI, is an organism certifying energy efficiency efforts or energy audits in a house. For any individual working in this field, a BPI training and thus certification is a proof that knowledge and competences have been verified by an independent third party. BPI then oversees everything related to residential energy efficiency, home’s energy flow and energy conservation.

BPI Certification


There are several levels of BPI training, each specified in a different field, BPI Multifamily Building Analyst for example teaches participants the standards and practices for energy auditing large housing complexes with multiple family units while BPI Heating professional focuses on how the heating system of a residential building works. Though a lot of BPI certification is out there, the first step is usually to start with the BPI Building Analyst, which wraps up the main knowledge needed in energy auditing. As an energy auditor, you want to offer your clients the best services and leave them with a complete feeling of satisfaction; this can also be done by enabling them to get State incentives. Indeed, homeowners are required to work with a BPI auditor in order to qualify for various incentive programs. Local and national programs are creating more and more of these incentives for energy audits, this means the demand for BPI certified energy auditors will continue to grow and give to this certification a great future value.

BPI Building Analyst Training

The BPI Building Analyst certification is generally the first certification candidates will get for energy auditing, especially because this is a prerequisite in order to pass the other BPI certifications. This Building Analyst training will focus and emphasize on the “house as a system” approach to energy auditing, this model recognizes that all houses’ systems are interconnected, from gas and electric appliances to heating and cooling systems, building envelope, foundations … This certification has 3 main objectives for candidates; to understand the various types of systems within a house, their components, functions and how they inter-operate; to know the process of completing a BPI energy audit to Building Analyst Standards and be able to communicate this to customers; and finally to be able to conduct safety and performance tests to assess system condition, identify savings opportunities and to prepare a work scope with significant cost effective solutions.

The BPI Building Analyst Exam

The BPI BA exam is a two-hour 100 multiple choice questions test and a score of 70 is required to pass. There is also a two-hour field exam, where candidates will be tested on their knowledge and competencies with energy audit process and equipment (Blower door, Duct Blaster, Infrared Scanning, Pressure Pan, Combustion Analyzer).

Once the BPI BA exam passed, candidates can enhance their skills and careers by taking some of the BPI residential specialization we mentioned earlier and get more credentials in a booming industry.

Editor's note: To learn more about energy auditing and certifications, visit CleanEdison.com.

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