The Next Generation of Solar Panels? V3 Solar’s Spin Cells

Solar panels have become more familiar to us in recent years. At one time you would have been hard pushed to find a set of solar panels on a roof near you. Now it is exceedingly common to find these panels adorning roofs all over your local area, even if you don’t yet have them.

Of course as with any other type of technology, the cost of solar panels has reduced considerably in recent times. This is partly why more people have them. Between this and the feed-in tariff that has made the solar panels more appealing to have, we can see exactly why there are more of them around.

But if you are used to looking for flat solar panels, you may need to start looking for something a little different in the near future. The next solar panels for your home could end up with an arrangement of cone shaped solar cells on them instead.

Thank V3Solar for this new innovation

With more people taking the opportunity to generate their own renewable energy, it stands to reason we would start to see newer and better solar panels being developed. But this company has come up with a completely new angle to follow, which works on the premise of getting more efficiency for every square metre of roof space they would be installed on.

At the moment they are only in the prototype stage, but the premise is an exciting one. Imagine the footprint of a small cone – you can see it won’t be too large. But if you imagine the surface area of the cone, it doesn’t require an expert at maths to see how much bigger the surface area is. This is why their design has been verified to generate more than 20 times the amount of electricity a standard solar panel would generate. If you were to replace a single flat solar panel with lots of these cones, the consequences for your home – and for the amount of energy you could enjoy – would be amazing.

What is the name of this new technology?

V3 is calling the new solar cell the Spin Cell. Once the cell has been refined, it will be ready to be released for people to buy. No doubt those wanting the very best return on their solar investment will give serious consideration to this new design.

 

 

It is estimated that existing flat panels could provide around half of the energy used in a typical home. This varies from home to home of course, depending on the size of the installation and the amount of energy used. Now imagine how much energy you could get if you had these cones on your roof. You may never need to worry about the cost of an energy bill again, if you are getting twenty times the amount of energy current solar panels can generate.

Now doesn’t that sound like very good news to you?

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Tags: V3, cells, efficiency, energy, panels, solar, spin, v3

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