Schedule Regular Maintenance on Your Appliances to Avoid High Energy Costs

Many people want their purchases to work for 30 years with no upkeep, maintenance, or careful use on their part. This can work for standard things like chairs, desks, and blankets. However, the more complex something is the more likely that it will need to be repaired to ensure proper operation and energy efficiency. Anyone who works as a mechanic can tell you that frequent maintenance is much better than repair. This is because it is less expensive and your original parts will be available. Appliances are a great example of an item that can do with basic maintenance. Keeping the parts clean and running smoothly will allow it to last far longer than you would expect.

As far as the general care and feeding of a normal appliance, basics are the name of the game. Do not get parts of the appliance wet that are not designed to be wet. Never let an appliance stay for two long upside down or in an odd position. Keeping heavy things on top of a refrigerator or a dryer can wear out its parts and make it less likely to last for years and waste more energy. The next step you need to keep your appliance repair at bay and ensure energy efficiency is general maintenance.

The easiest way to think of this is like auto care. You have to change your brakes, oil, and rotate the tires so that the rest of your car doesn’t wear out. A repairman will be able to help you out and keep your items in good repair. Don’t listen to a handyman who tells you that he needs to come in every three months to check on your appliances. Most people recommend every six months to a year. If you are a heavy user of your stove, dryer, or fridge it may be a good idea to do it every six months in order to avoid appliance repair.

These tips and tricks will save you money in the long run. It may seem like a crazy expense for someone who just spent so much on the appliance itself. However, when you are still able to run appliances for more than ten years you will be much happier that you put in the money to keep your appliances running. Appliance repair can be expensive and in many cases it can be more expensive than just getting a new appliance. You want to be sure to avoid situations like this because you will just keep spending.

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