All,

How much electricity is need to roast a Thankgiving turkey & the rest of the holiday cooking extravaganza?

Monitoring baseline data from the Phased Deep Retrofit project being done by Florida Solar Energy Center for U.S. Department of Energy allows us to answer that question. Thanksgiving cooking in our 30 home, all electric sample averaged 2.76 kWh, 2.03 kWh more than it did on the Thursday before Thanksgiving (0.73 kWh)

Note that in the plots below, the left axis scales for Watts vary for each.

Range Circuit on Thanksgiving, November 22nd: Varied form 0 kWh (e.g. Site 5 to 12.4 kWh (Site 7). Obviously, not everyone was home; some were visiting others.



The average demand profile in the overall sample = 2.76 kWh for the day. Note how cooking really ramps off by 11 AM after the Macy's Day parade is done. Sufficiently dosed with Tryptophan, the kitchen manager is immobile by 6 PM...





Range Loads on Thursday, November 15th before Thanksgiving: Varied from 0.0 (Site 27) to 3.81 kWh (Site 5)



Average Profile = 0.73 kWh with most of range power in the evening with a small spike associated with breakfast preparation.




For comparative interest, the same sort of analysis done for another Florida monitoring project 13 years ago. Those data showed in a sample of 70 home with a monitored electric range that Thanksgiving cooking was about 2.5 kWh-- which is similar to what we estimated this year. Shape of the profile also looks similar.

Happy holidays to everyone.

Kind Regards,

Danny Parker

Views: 1462

Tags: Cooking, Florida, Thanksgiving, end-use, monitoring

Comment

You need to be a member of Home Energy Pros to add comments!

Join Home Energy Pros

Comment by tedkidd on November 28, 2012 at 12:59pm

Hi Danny!!  Cool charts!

My Ecobee charts suggest one of my tenants cooked a turkey on Friday, that one furnace mysteriously stopped calling every few minutes.  

http://bit.ly/4ecobeethermostats

I'd love to see CO levels across the time..

Comment by Sean Lintow Sr on November 28, 2012 at 12:07pm

Interesting look at the numbers & love the side analysis (immobile by 6).  no surprise on it being the same so many years later - tv's might be larger, but more efficient & the BTU's needed then to cook / boil are the same needed today. Be interesting to see effects of induction & convection vrs standard

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Twitter

Latest Activity

Profile IconShane Matteson, Jay Cooper and Mike Harris joined Home Energy Pros
8 hours ago
Kim Burnett commented on Diane Chojnowski's group Home Energy Pros on Twitter
"Good morning, would you please add me. Thank you. Kim Burnett A+ Abundant Energy Experts"
10 hours ago
Kim Burnett joined Diane Chojnowski's group
Thumbnail

Home Energy Pros on Twitter

We've created a twitter list of members of Home Energy Pros who tweet about home performance and…See More
10 hours ago
Luke Langhals replied to Luis Hernandez's discussion ERV Configuration
"Very good reading. Thank you for posting this."
12 hours ago
Luke Langhals replied to Diane Chojnowski's discussion Poll: How confident do you feel about the future of home performance?
"This poll would change on a day to day basis :) I'm cynical one day and extremely optimistic…"
12 hours ago
Luke Langhals liked tedkidd's discussion Dear DOE, PACE sucks - please fix or make it go away...
12 hours ago
Nicole Scheunemann's video was featured

Airtight, Tested Right: Blower Door Tests for Contractors

Contractors: with a new New York State Energy Code going into effect in October 2016, it’s important to know what you’ll be on the hook for when it comes to ...
13 hours ago
Eve Dunham replied to Kim Tanner's discussion Facebook page targeting and privacy in the group Marketing Energy Efficiency
"I have used the targeted ads feature for age, location, etc. I have had moderate success with this.…"
yesterday

© 2016   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service