-Draw blinds, shades, drapes – Close window dressings to block the sunlight during the hottest part of the day, especially on south and west-facing windows. 

· Adjust the thermostat – Adjusting your thermostat a few degrees can lead to big savings on your bill. The Grid recommends a setting of 78 degrees or higher. Remember to keep the air flowing freely by replacing air filters. 

· Use programmable thermostats – Use of programmable thermostats optimizes air conditioning systems, helping to boost energy savings. The Grid offers a $25 rebate for each seven-day programmable thermostat that you install (maximum two per household). 

· Change air conditioner settings and filter – The lower you set your temperature on your air conditioner, the more costly it is to operate. For example, a 75-degree setting will cost about 18 percent more than a 78 degree setting. Set the thermostat on your air conditioner as high as comfort will permit. In addition, check your air conditioner filter and replace or clean it if it is clogged. 

· Turn off ceiling fans – Ceiling fans don’t actually cool your home; they only circulate air to make you feel cooler. Therefore, they are most effective when you’re home to enjoy the benefits. Turn them off when you’re not home and save energy in the process.

-Manage your water heater – Decreasing the water heater temperature from 140 degrees to 120 degrees can help save up to $85 per year. A setting of 120 degrees is sufficient for most household needs. If you head out of town, turn it off entirely. There's no need to heat unused water. Plus, once turned back on, most models will reheat the water to the set temperature in about an hour.

 
· Unplug electronics – Even though your television and other appliances are turned off, many electronics still draw electricity. Unplug any unnecessary electronics and chargers until you return home. In addition, using an advanced Power Strip on your entertainment system reduces phantom energy use which can save you up to $30 annually.

· Use light timers, motion detectors – Many people like to leave a light on to indicate someone is home while they are away. Use a light timer instead; this also gives a more realistic impression of someone being at home. Rather than leaving your porch light on the entire time you’re gone, install a motion detector to be used both when you’re at home and away.

-Check refrigerator and freezer temps – The ideal refrigerator temperature is between 37 and 40 degrees. For the freezer the ideal reading is 5 degrees. It is also important to keep your refrigerator and freezer full so that they do not have to work as hard to stay cold. This can drastically lower the amount of energy that they'd ordinarily need to function properly.


-Consider replacing or recycling older-model working refrigerators, especially if older than 10 years – Older model refrigerators often can use more than four times the energy of newer models and cost up to $150 a year to run. Customers can recycle their old or second refrigerator through the Grid. The company will not only pick it up for free, but will also provide a rebate. You’ll save energy, money and help keep these appliances out of landfills.


· Plant a tree – Planting a deciduous tree on the west or south side of your house can provide shade that will help keep it cool in the summer. And, when the leaves fall, it will let more light and warmth through in the colder months, helping keep the house warmer and brighter to help fight off those winter doldrums. Don’t forget to plant away from power lines and call before you dig by dialing 811.

- Save the Grid!  The Grid

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