While listening to Peter Troast of Energy Circle and Allison Bailes of Energy Vanguard speak in front of a room about social media and Internet marketing for the home performance industry, it's easy for your head to feel like it may explode. In the best possible way, of course.

I was lucky enough to get this feeling last week as the duo tag-teamed a presentation titled "Internet Marketing 201: Advanced Techniques in Web and Social Media" at the ACI National conference in Baltimore. Now, as I'm writing this blog, my mind is reeling with items I should be doing (including keywords, finding images online to accompany the blog, is there a video I can include?). It's exhausting. And I know I'm not the only one that feels this way, which is why Peter and Allison were nice enough to share some quick easy tips with us.

Here were some of my personal favorites that I hope you'll also find useful.

7 Twitter Tips for Newbies:

  1. Be patient.
  2. Find your people. (Lists on Twitter are a great way to do this.)
  3. Observe.
  4. Interact.
  5. Don't just promote your company.
  6. Learn the protocols.
  7. Read "How to Manage Twitter" by Chris Brogan.

3 Steps to Turn Traffic (to your website) Into Leads (for your business):

  1. Have credibility.
  2. Use effective calls to action.
  3. Offer white papers and other downloads for free. (In return, request their basic information, such as name, company, and contact.)

A Few Blogging Tips:

  • Aim for somewhere between 500 and 800 words per post.
  • Keep the season in mind. (If it's winter, write about heating systems, for example.)
  • Update regularly.
  • Have fun and meaningful content.

Although there's much more to Internet marketing and social media than this, it's a good place to begin. Also, don't be afraid to ask questions of our home performance peers. Start a discussion on Home Energy Pros, browse Facebook, read blogs...it all helps. Good luck!

It's a fact: 75% of companies now use Twitter as a marketing channel.

Photo courtesy of linkedmediagrp.

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Comment by Macie Melendez on April 5, 2012 at 9:39am

Hi Michael, Thanks! What's your social media website address? I'd be happy to take a look...of course, I'm no expert :)

Comment by Michael D'Orazio on April 4, 2012 at 7:58pm

Hello Macie,  Like your blog.  I have read alot of Peter Troast's blogs and presentations on social media.

In fact I just launched a social media website focused on energy efficiency and conservation.  Would love to get your thoughts.

 

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