Home Energy Consumption for your region and your rates

Below is a post I published on calculating a home energy use by region using a tool my utility (Georgia Power) provided (made by Apogee).  It's a nice tool to show homeowners if their utility provides something similar.  It could help you validate how improvements to the home can help save energy.

----------------

Usually when I receive emails from my electric utility, Georgia Power, promising to offer energy saving tips I ignore them because they are just too basic. The other day I got an email that said the following:

High temperatures can impact your monthly electric bill because your air conditioning system must work harder to keep your home comfortable. To help manage this potential impact, I invite you to use our free online tool to find personalized ways to save. You’ll also find out where you use the most electricity in your home and why your bill changes from month to month.

So I decided to play along.

The problem I've had with most energy tip websites that show breakdowns of how homes use energy is that they aren't specific to each region and climate zones. When we covered Household Energy Usewe showed a breakdown of how a typical single family home uses energy, but not every home is going to be typical. You can see that breakdown below:

My concern with the above chart is that I was convinced I spent more money cooling my home in the summer than I did heating it in the winter.

Which is where the energy checkup tool provided by Georgia Power comes in. The tool is a home energy calculator produced by Apogee, who provides software solutions to utilities. I started by telling the tool which region in Georgia I lived in, and then spent about 5 minutes filling out questionnaire which asked things like the the type of home I lived in (middle town-home), how many square feet, how many people were there and away during the day, what my thermostat is set to during the summer and winter (more on this below), what type of windows, how many lights have I changed to fluorescent (percentage based), how I cool (electric air conditioner) and heat (natural gas furnace), etc. I've filled out many of these questionnaires and this one was relatively painless. It was much easier than the original questionnaire that the now defunct Microsoft Hohmtried to get me to fill out but I gave up after 20 minutes.

The summary of the information I entered can be seen below (it's not 100% accurate, but very close)

You can see the pie chart from my report below:

You can see that cooling definitely makes up the most of my energy spend. What I like most about the report that was generated is that it relies heavily on charts and graphs, which really help users visualize where their money is going.

My biggest complaint with the questionnaire is that it doesn't spend enough time on thermostat setting. It asks you to pick one temperature for the heating setting and one for the cooling setting, and at the bottom of the page explains :

Please select a temperature that is the effective average temperature in your home during a 24-hour period. For example, if you keep your thermostat at 70 degrees during the day and at 64 degrees for 8 hours each night, your effective average temperature would be 68 degrees. (Note: Programmable thermostats create an effective average temperature by making temperature setting changes automatically at the times that you designate.)


But for people with programmable thermostats, most know what they set the thermostat at for different times during the day (home, away, sleep) so why not allow users to fill in the times and settings if they know them? I think that would provide a more accurate approach to understanding the largest energy consumer in the home. Then the suggestions the tool produces could be more precise (i.e. "try turning up the temperature of your downstairs in sleep mode in the summer to 80º instead of 78º").

At this point you're probably wondering, "So how does this tool compare to reality?". Well, let's look at my actual bill amounts for electricity and natural gas below:

While I'm missing August in the real world comparison, if you compare the image above to the one at the top of the post (which was taken from the report), you can see that they are very close to each other! Once I update the graph with the August bills, I expect them to be much lower than July because August was not nearly as hot.

If you live in a hot climate where your air conditioning system makes up the bulk of your home's energy load, you may want to dig a little deeper and check out our post on Air Conditioner Power Consumption.

What other tools have you found that help you calculate where and how you use energy?

Views: 809

Comment

You need to be a member of Home Energy Pros to add comments!

Join Home Energy Pros

Comment by Ryan Schuchler on September 26, 2012 at 10:34am

Chris, very good question. RESFEN software is pretty easy to use once you get familiar with the set up of the program. Overall, it's fairly straightforward, but if a homeowner does get stuck or have any issues on where to input certain data, the Knowledge Base link on the RESFEN website is extremely helpful.

Comment by Bob Blanchette on September 25, 2012 at 5:38pm

I must have missed the replay earlier. Yes you need a smartmeter (free from the utility). It does not break down use by appliance. In order to break down use by appliance each appliance would need to be metered individually.

Comment by Chris Kaiser on September 25, 2012 at 10:31am

Thanks Ryan.  It looks like the RESFEN program is free.  How easy is it to use if a homeowner wanted to use it prior to contacting a window installer?

Comment by Ryan Schuchler on September 25, 2012 at 8:39am

Chris, thank you for the informative and well-written blog. The US Department of Energy supports a computer simulation called RESFEN, which currently provides the most accurate estimates available for home improvement energy savings. Many replacement window companies would be more than happy to run a RESFEN report on your home. This program even gives homeowners the opportunity to compare projected energy savings from two different product lines against one another, which provides insight into which particular home improvement projects would yield the greatest amount of energy savings. Hopefully this info is helpful. Thanks again for posting this interesting article!

Comment by Chris Kaiser on September 6, 2012 at 6:18pm

Bob, but that's only if you have a smart meter right?  Does it break it down by end use application?

Comment by Bob Blanchette on September 6, 2012 at 5:35pm

The myogepower website give me hour by hour breakdowns of power consumption and cost.

Home Energy Pros

Home Energy Pros was founded by the developers of Home Energy Saver Pro (sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy,) and brought to you in partnership with Home Energy magazine.

Latest Activity

Mst. Fatema Aktar is now a member of Home Energy Pros
6 hours ago
Robert Leone added a discussion to the group Energy Auditing Equipment for Sale, Trade or to Purchase
Thumbnail

Blower Door Package for Sale

Hi,I am selling my blower door with extras as a package or individually. These items are used but…See More
13 hours ago
Profile IconRobert Leone and Richard Vito joined allen p tanner's group
Thumbnail

Energy Auditing Equipment for Sale, Trade or to Purchase

Discuss the pros and cons of the equipment you are interested in prior to purchase. Post equipment…See More
13 hours ago
Richard Vito joined Sean Lintow Sr's group
Thumbnail

Best Practices (Residential)

Best Building, Retrofitting, or even Auditing Practices - what are they, what should change, what…See More
21 hours ago
Richard Vito joined James Sayers's group
Thumbnail

Marketing Energy Efficiency

Sharing ideas, tools and examples of promoting energy efficiency to consumersSee More
21 hours ago
Richard Vito joined Allison A. Bailes III's group
Thumbnail

HVAC

HVAC design, Manuals J, S, T, & D, Duct leakage, Air flow, ENERGY STAR new home requirements,…See More
21 hours ago
Richard Vito joined Kyle Brown's group
Thumbnail

Wrightsoft - Manual J / Manual D

If you use Wrightsoft to calculate loads or design ducts, you likely have questions.  Get answers…See More
21 hours ago
Jim Gunshinan commented on Jim Gunshinan's blog post Energy Upgrade California—Up Close and Personal
"I had a revelation while attending Bruce Manclark's session of duct leak testing at the Energy…"
yesterday
George J. Nesbitt commented on Jim Gunshinan's blog post Energy Upgrade California—Up Close and Personal
"Blower Door; the 2007 test was a depressurization test, and the 2014 a pressurization test, which…"
yesterday
George J. Nesbitt replied to Kaushal Bharath Raju's discussion Affordability & Deep Energy Upgrade/Passive House Retrofit in Berkeley, California.
"Plan, plan, plan, plan. The 1st step to is to understand the house, how it's built, the…"
yesterday
George J. Nesbitt posted an event

High Performance Windows - A Panel of Experts at Pyramid Alehouse`

April 26, 2014 from 3pm to 5pm
Join a lively panel discussion on high performance windows. We'll cover some basics, as well as…See More
yesterday
Kaushal Bharath Raju replied to Kaushal Bharath Raju's discussion Affordability & Deep Energy Upgrade/Passive House Retrofit in Berkeley, California.
"Hi David, Thanks for pointing out Martin Holiday's article. I do not wish to engage in the…"
yesterday

© 2014   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service