INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY USERS

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INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY USERS

This group is dedicated to knowledge sharing and discussion of infrared thermography for building sciences and energy applications.

Members: 167
Latest Activity: Oct 14

Discussion Forum

Google Thermal View? 4 Replies

As most of you know, there is more to an energy audit or energy rating (such as a HERS rating) than just the thermal imaging - but this start up company is using it to get a nationwide database going.........Here's a link to the article on…Continue

Tags: Audit, business, Energy, Google, imaging

Started by Joshua Knittel. Last reply by tedkidd May 31, 2013.

Infrared Image - What is it? 6 Replies

We thought it'd be fit to share this infrared image we received from group member, CK Ang, in New Zealand. Just wanted to spark some discussion here on what you guys think this image is of, and what the problem could be. A little background on the…Continue

Tags: Fluke, Ti55FT, telephoto, lens, Ang

Started by Fluke Thermal Imaging. Last reply by Dale Sherman Apr 26, 2012.

Timber Home with no effective air barrier 1 Reply

Hi folks,just another image of a brand new timber home without an effective air barrier, and without sealing tapes.…Continue

Started by Davide Lanzoni. Last reply by Sean Lintow Sr Apr 11, 2012.

New article on infrared thermography 1 Reply

The Journal of Light Construction has long been respected as a place where builders can educate themselves and share information. I was recently asked to write an article introducing their readers to thermography and how it can be used in the…Continue

Started by John Snell. Last reply by Jim Klebes Nov 17, 2011.

Moisture detection, a fascinating thermal signature

I don't mean to derail folks from this website to ours (I often send folks here too!) but that is exactly what I'm going to do because www.IRTalk.com has a fascinating discussion about thermal signatures of…Continue

Started by John Snell Sep 9, 2011.

New York first passivhaus ... 4 Replies

... with windows with a better R-value than walls ?…Continue

Started by Davide Lanzoni. Last reply by John Snell Aug 25, 2011.

Using thermal imagers in the summer 5 Replies

Too many thermographers leave their imagers in the case during the summer. This comes, in part, from the way we used to work when imagers were not nearly as sensitive and our understanding of how to use them was limited to winter work.Get the darned…Continue

Started by John Snell. Last reply by Tyson Pischel Jul 7, 2011.

Expert Eye Needed 15 Replies

Hi AllWanted to get the opinion of an expert.Attached is a photo of a customer's window.... as you can see there is a large cold spot above the window... Here's my opinion..am I right?The large horizontal cold spot is thermal bridging from the…Continue

Tags: windows, ir

Started by Matthew P. Last reply by Ed Minch Jun 30, 2011.

IR and Moisture Meters 12 Replies

As many of you know the new RESNET Guidelines are being worked on and I am advocating for the use of Moisture Meters to ensure potential serious moisture problems in sidewalls and building substrate material is not being overlooked when identified…Continue

Started by Bret Monroe. Last reply by allen p tanner Jun 23, 2011.

Certification for RESNET Thermographers 12 Replies

I’m just back from the RESNET national conference in Orlando and I am very excited to report that RESNET certification is now available! What’s needed?• You must be a RESNET Building Performance Auditor or a Rater• You must have 3 months experience…Continue

Started by John Snell. Last reply by Mark Cleminson Mar 22, 2011.

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Comment by John Snell on May 26, 2011 at 4:50pm

Hal, One of the issues you run right into using thermography to show the impact of insulating coatings is that the imagers SEE radiation. Thus if the coating reflects radiation in the wavelengths detected by the imager, you'll see that but that doesn't necessarily show how effective the coating is. Better to paint some of the interior wall surfaces and leave others unpainted and then look at the wall from the exterior; of course this assumes all walls are same construction (except the coating) and that all thermal influences on both sides of the wall are similar. 

I know some folks have tried this sort of test but I'm not convinced they "dotted all their i's and crossed all their t's" if you know what I mean.

It might be more effective to design a demonstration on a smaller scale, say a couple of cardboard boxes with the same internal heat source. If the coating actually reduced heat transfer, it would show up on the exterior side. John N. is correct, however, in that most people would not accept a couple of cardboard boxes as good science!

Comment by John Nicholas on May 26, 2011 at 9:04am

Hal,

 

If you set it up so you could follow a standardized testing protocol, such as RESNET, ANSI, or ASTM perhaps you could make a claim.  Would your claim be accepted by the building performance industry?  Some would, some wouldn't.

 

Your best bet to establish a insulative value for any product claiming to retard heat transfer is to pay an independent lab to do a guarded hot box test on it.  That will actually measure the heat loss per sf in each sample.  The test is repeatable, and is not subject to interpretation.  With this independent test, you can get DOE, RESNET, BPI and other entities that are recognized within the industry to use the information.

Comment by Hal Skinner on May 26, 2011 at 7:57am

Hi Michael.

 

I have a question;  How exact a science is thermal imaging?  I have many years working with an insulating coating but ZERO experiences with thermal imaging.

 

Hypothetical situation;  If we painted an insulating coating on the interior sheetrock of a home, say we painted half a wall, I would expect a themal image showing a reduction in the loss of heat through that wall to the outside colder air.

 

Is thermal imaging an exact enough science so that those images can be analyzed to determine the exact amount of heat loss reduced and thereby calculate it's equivolent R-rating? 

 

Thanks and my apologies if this sounds like a dumb question.

Comment by Michael Stuart on February 3, 2011 at 4:14pm
I apologize that I have not posted anything interesting the group lately... but I have been a busy guy!   However, I attended ACI Northwest this week down in Portland, Oregon and had a great time.   On Monday of this week, I had an opportunity to perform a fun infrared inspection and blower door test with some other colleagues on a south Portland home.   I will share some of the images as soon as I get a chance to get them out of my Ti32 imager.  I also strongly encourage all other members of this group to post examples of your work, ask questions, and prod us into meaningful discussions.
Comment by Michael Stuart on December 23, 2010 at 10:19am

Happy Holidays to all on HEP!  May all of your season's wishes come true!  And may we all have a prosperous New Year!

Comment by Michael Stuart on December 13, 2010 at 1:42pm

TJ,

 

Thanks for the follow up with all of us.   Interesting developments.  Thanks for the added images as well.

Comment by TJ Ewing on December 12, 2010 at 7:43pm

Hi all,

Sorry it took me so long to update, I’ve been in a mad dash to the holidays!  So we did take the bulletin board off (which showed evidence of wetting/rot on its backside) and the church reps were more than eager to do a destructive core given the many decades of trouble with this wall. So they did! We learned we have 4" block with at most a 1/2" air gap to the brick that is most likely impeded in many places by mortar. No vapor or air barrier present and no block insulation or filling.  We saw no direct evidence of internal wall moisture. There's been a lot of confusion by the church reps on when the wetness appears. But at this point we have an externally concentrated drainage area of a large portion of roof, potential irrigation spray onto the brick during summer, less than adequate drainage away from the external side of the brick veneer wall, a weak drainage plane, no weeps in the wall, and some contact between the brick and concrete. Controlling water sources is primary in our minds as we think the wall is wicking bulk moisture via the wall surface and from the ground. When the morning sun hits the SE facing wall, it drives the moisture in which condenses underneath the interior wall paint. The church is replacing the bulletin board with standoffs and we are leaving our core hole open for now.  We aim to control moisture first, and when the event happens again, take more details of the internal and external conditions when it does.

Have a great holiday season,
TJ 

 



Comment by Michael Stuart on December 6, 2010 at 7:49am
So TJ... did you ever get the bulletin board down for a closer look?
Comment by allen p tanner on November 18, 2010 at 11:30am
To properly scan a concrete block wall; the wall needs to be thermally loaded. The Delta T needs to be high enough, (18*f or more), to get a good scan. Again, it is nearly impossible to IR a concrete block wall from the inside. Go to nyinfraredscan.com and you will see that we IR block walls as a business. I would not recommend scanning a block wall, especially one with a brick facade, from the inside. Wood frame walls with missing insulation are very well accepted for IR imaging from the inside of exterior walls.
Let me know what you find. Are you going to do a destructive core sample?
Comment by Michael Stuart on November 18, 2010 at 10:57am
TJ, You definitely have an array of theories presented so far. It will be interesting to see what additional data you can obtain on Friday to support or debunk them. Please let us all know what you find. If you take the bulletic board down, please post both visible and infrared images. (We will be waiting in suspense!)
 

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