This furnace was installed two years ago in a conditioned basement.  The ductwork is a thin flexible plastic like that of a clothes dryer (but with a 6" diameter).   This is the second one that I've seen in the past year (Oregon).   Is this up to code?

 

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The plastic would need to be rated for the temps the furnace delivers.  Is there a tag on the plastic?  The maufacturer would have the specs as to temp and application.  It isnt pretty but it is functional.  The specs on the plastic will give you the information you need but you might have to call the manufacturer.  I personally would be very suspect about it.   Have you performed a Temp Rise on the furnace?
This is crap work and should be redone, but is allowed by code.
I agree that the quality of work on this radial system can be called into question. But I a, very surprised to hear this would meet code. Based on the 2009 IECC, that ductwork being in unconditioned space should have a minimum R-value. Here is MA and RI, inspectors hold the contractor to this spec, R-8 outside the building envelope and R-6 for inside - in a basement like this for example. This may be a place to start regarding this particular job, looks pretty recent...
I agree that the quality of work on this radial system can be called into question. But I am very surprised to hear this would meet code. Based on the 2009 IECC, that ductwork being in unconditioned space should have a minimum R-value. Here is MA and RI, inspectors hold the contractor to this spec, R-8 outside the building envelope and R-6 for inside - in a basement like this for example. This may be a place to start regarding this particular job, looks pretty recent...

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