I am involved in a QC program that straddles two of the four zones BPI uses to identify LBL "N" factors. Has anyone ever seen a map with enough resolution that could help determine whether a project lands in one zone or another? My area of concern is the division between zones 3 and 4 in southern California.  

Has anyone correlated the LBL N-factor zones with California Energy Commission climate zones?

With a requirement to meet ASHRAE standards, the 15% factor difference between zones could be significant.

Views: 1701

Replies to This Discussion

If you are in doubt, just use the middle value common to both zone 3 and 4:  23. 

 

The whole formula isn't all that precise anyways.  The N factors for each zone are a range of four numbers - that should tell you something.  Using the lower number will allow you to seal up a house tighter without having to do ASHRAE 1989.   But to meet ASHARE 62.2 - 2010, you probably have to install some kind of ventilation anyways - the only question is what cfm rate to set the fan at.

 

If you want to be more precise, use ASTM 779 and ASHRAE Standards 119 and 136 to calculate your own N factor instead of using that burry map.

 

RSS

Latest Activity

John Nicholas replied to Brent Shapiro's discussion Investigating 3257KWH monthly usage issue.
"Check out the DHW unit.  What temperature is the water entering and leaving the unit?…"
31 minutes ago
Brent Shapiro replied to Brent Shapiro's discussion Investigating 3257KWH monthly usage issue.
"With regard to the outside lighting - zero outside lighting, in fact the lighting in the basement…"
2 hours ago
Green ID posted blog posts
3 hours ago
Rob Buchanan posted a discussion

Building envelope and mechanical interactive effects

Good afternoon everyone,I was reviewing some of the old BPI newsletters and noticed a…See More
7 hours ago

Photos

Loading…
  • Add Photos
  • View All

© 2017   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service