Do energy audits that neglect doing the "subset" of a lighting audit underserve the client ?

 

 If your auto mechanic excluded evaluations of 20% -30% of your car would you be happy

with the scope of that assessment ?  How about if you went to a doctor for a physical and

they didn't bother checking 1/3 of your body would you be OK with that ?

 

 I bring it up because I have had some dealings with some well regarded energy auditors recently-

I inquired about the scope of their assessments - None were doing an adequete job of assessing

how kWs were used for the task of lighting- thats at minimum 1/5 of the total consumption of electric on thier electric bill, Not so "consumer friendly"--- of course this is

 assuming it's not an amish guy's home -

 

So whats up with that ? - just food for thought for those "purporting" to do thorough home or business, energy use evaluations. As a consumer I would liken it to those candybars with

small air bubbles in 'em. There's a similar disconnect regarding paying for the whole thing

and not getting the whole thing. The air is something but in that instance it's nothing of value-

Light  is the medium we work in and flourish in - Its a big part of life and a substantial portion

of kWs used in almost everyones life- The scope of recommendations I heard from these

energy auditors on the topic was - if they are using a lot of incandescent we recommend that

they switch to CFLs - pretty damned weak if ya ask me !!

 

 

Views: 360

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

 it's more gotcha capatalism- not unlike subway with their 11"  sandwiches that they are calling footlongs

 

consumers ought to get what they pay for. Anyone disagree ? Any auditors want to defend their BPI or

Resnet audits that are doing the same thing ? I mean 1" less of a sandwich is kinda inconsequential

but there are folks payin $750 for audits that are not having that lighting portion of these expensive audits

performed who are ripping people off !!  Consumers should revolt !! some advice bring a tape measure to

subway and show this post to your friendly energy auditor and start calling these offending parties out-

 

I've always included lighting and appliances (pools & spas too) in my "audits". I've always assumed they were part of the "house".
But sadly our industry tends to focus on the HVAC, air sealing & insulation.
But for many customers their plug loads are killing them financially.even though they may have comfort (and energy use) issues with the thermal enclosure & hvac, plumbing.

 George-

 

 Regarding thoroughness in audits, So You're the one- I actually know of a slight increase in energy

auditor awareness about this so called 80% syndrome. I commend you for your comprehensive approach.

 

There is one Chi area firm that is interested in my talents (they do home performamce evaluations) &

the principal instructs + certifies "newbies" & he is interested in buying a curriculum that's all about the

subset of lighting audits.

 

So I'm out there raising the topic in hopes of bolstering the ranks of

energy auditors who look at + help resolve illogical energy use patterns that relate to lighting.

 

Oh well one down 34 to go !

 

If you must use CFL use only high quality lamps.  If its a PACE or some other funding source use and apply LED.  They work out on audits when you include everything.  

d

Our audits subdivide the home into "Energy Centers", seven at minimum:

Building Envelope

HVAC

Water heating

Lighting

Kitchen / refrigeration

Laundry

Media / entertainment

If present:

Pool / spa - pumping and heating

irrigation / water features

Outbuildings

Miscellaneous significant loads not part of any of the above.

Kurt

 While I'm glad Your team takes a comprehensive approach - when just looking

at kW use and how much is used due to lighting , I wish that it were standard . I look

forward to a time in energy assessments in the near future where lighting power density

factors are laid out (like thermal images) with  annual system operational cost data-

as standard operarating procedure in getting this building performance data compiled and

delivered to decision makers.

 

 and then when lighting choices are talked about or better yet - installed

I hope that end users will be happy with their systems for many years- because

they had qualified , vetted products/ systems put in place. Because they "choose well"

I want end users to feel smug because their "right choice" helped for a decade or two.

 

Three reasons we don't get overly analytical about lighting:

1) It generally amounts to just 10-20% of total usage, other centers loom larger

2) My general recommendation is to change out any incandescent lamp used more than a few minutes per day  with a CFL or LED. Included in that are closet and attic lights which have a high chance of being left on inadvertently for extended periods

3) It is hard to be certain how many hours per day most lamps are burned

Your approach seems more suited to commercial lighting. Our utility's rebate program "InvestSmart" has a huge spreadsheet into which one enters every fixture and it operating hours.

RSS

Home Energy Pros

Home Energy Pros was founded by the developers of Home Energy Saver Pro (sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy,) and brought to you in partnership with Home Energy magazine.

Latest Activity

Hal Skinner replied to Hal Skinner's discussion How much heat energy is lost through the floor of a house?
"I found the buildingscience article interesting.  Interesting that they noted the wet bottom…"
4 hours ago
Bud Poll replied to Hal Skinner's discussion How much heat energy is lost through the floor of a house?
"With conduction that ends at the bottom of the joists and convection that is naturally suppressed…"
5 hours ago
Hal Skinner replied to Hal Skinner's discussion How much heat energy is lost through the floor of a house?
"Good morning Bud, Took a quick look at the site and a couple others listed on the Yahoo…"
7 hours ago
Bud Poll replied to Hal Skinner's discussion How much heat energy is lost through the floor of a house?
"Hi Hal, Search "Basecalc basement heat loss".  From memory Canada (nrcan) has/had a…"
8 hours ago
Michael Dunseith posted photos
20 hours ago
Hal Skinner replied to Hal Skinner's discussion How much heat energy is lost through the floor of a house?
"II just remembered seeing a report by a federal adency, many years ago, that basically said …"
yesterday
Don Fitchett commented on Tom White's video
Thumbnail

Alliant Energy's PowerHouse TV: Sealing Leaky Ductwork

"Very educational. thanks for sharing Tom."
yesterday
Hal Skinner posted a discussion

How much heat energy is lost through the floor of a house?

I am asking this as I do not recall anyone speaking of any study to this end.  Many comments about…See More
yesterday

© 2014   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service