Good Morning

   I wrote this in one of my groups and i didn't get a reply, maybe I didn't do it correctly. I recently did an audit on 2 homes in Hollywood , Ca built in the 50's which have pocket doors. Because of those doors I got readings of 9000cfm When I found the leak and walked thru it. It was like going thru a car wash when they where blowing the water off. I can blowdry my curly hair straight. lol

    Now I need to fix the problem, the question how to go about it, from the crawl space ? or attic? or drywall? comments greatly appreciated

Thanks for listening.

Judi Lyall with SHE BUILDS "GREEN"

 

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If the cavity for the pocket door was constructed as many were - open to the exterior walls, then here's a fix: Slide the pocket door out, measure it, poke your tape measure into the cavity to determine how much room you have between the exterior wall and the outer edge of the door when it is wide open (i.e. pushed back into its slot).

Then if you have the room, slice off a fitting piece of blueboard or similar extruded polystyrene foam board insulation wide enough to fill the cavity where the doors are, poke it into place where the carpenters back in the day left the exterior open to the pocket door slot, and then with caulk, seal the edges. If the Blower Door retest indicates still more flow after this exercise, then it's the top plate or crawl space that will need your air-sealing expertise. This way you can get the most likely culprit, the wall connection, while standing up. Later you may HAFF to get dirty chasing down the attic/crawl connections.

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