What software program do you use for an Audit report?

I would like some feedback on software programs used for audit reports, what do you use ?

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I looked when I first started and couldnt find anything that did everything I wanted it to for an existing home audit.  Recently there has been some promising looking software that has or will be released soon.  Check out Optimiser, by Energy Logic and Recurve software by Recurve.  These two look promising.  The big negative for both of them is that you have to pay use fees instead of being allowed to purchase the software.  I believe I like the Optimiser software better for existing home audits for its customization and weather normalization features.  Check them out and let me know what you think.  I'd love to know if there are any others out there as well.

My company uses Recurve for our existing home analyses, and we've had excellent experiences. Optimiser also appears to be a high quality product, with similar quality of data outputs, though I've not used it in a home. It's not as pretty as Recurve. Both companies appear to be very receptive to feedback and improvement requests.
Thanks for your insight Nathan.  Are you able to review with the homeowner, the audit findings and recommendations based on Recurve's report before leaving the home?  How long does the typical home audit take you?

Yes, I can present a polished report to the homeowner on my first site visit. It takes some additional time to prepare. Depending on the size and complexity of the home's geometry and systems, a pretty thorough home analysis can take 2-4 hours, with another 30-60 minutes for report preparation.

 

If you are computer science (ie programming) savvy, you can also set up pricing in the same software, so you are able to present an accurately priced contract for the homeowner to sign at the same time. After the initial investment in programming (which can be a few hours or many days, depending on the complexity and quantity of improvements you want to include), that adds another 15-30 minutes to the time at the residence.

Thank's Matt, I'll look into them
Hancock's HEAT models the home on site and delivers energy savings and reports that can be printed at the homeowners house.  HEAT's app works on the ipad.  An energy auditor from DC that uses it is speaking at a webinar Best Practice next week, 3 p.m. ET Tuesday April 19, 2011 -- sign up to see it here: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/565383497   . He'll talk about what it's like to not use paper and carry the iPad in tight spaces, as well as the energy modeling capabilities.

 

Here is HEAT on the app store:http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/heat-professional-home-energy/id4261...

You should also check out gREATESST Efficiency Automation Tool. You have many options to customize your data collection and report outputs. It also integrates with energy efficiency modeling softwares like Beacon Home Energy Advisor so that you don't have to enter the data twice. The program is free. Here is a link to the webpage: www.greatesst.com
When will gREATESST be available? I just registered for a trial and received an email saying I will be notified when it is released.

Greattest is not a modeling tool, but what they are calling an integration tool.  We are in Delaware and work in 4 states under perhaps 7 programs, each with a different modeling tool - Beacon, etc. Greattest is a program that allows you to see the same audit pages to fill out each time, so learn it once, then just download the results into the various modeling software - no learning the various programs and hassling with them - anyone who has used Beacon knows what I am talking about.  In addition, spending an extra 3/4 hour or so at a house, you can leave the HO with a report on your way out the door - done.

Ed Minch

I've seen a bit about the early EPS and it appeared to me, that it is oversimplified, and will not give much in the way of specific information - just generalizations.   Gives a rating of 1 to 10?   Vaguely similar to the various free, online auditing tools you can find - and they can use your actual energy consumption & rates, not just an estimate. 
While modeling energy savings is great when there is a decent return on the project, and carbon reduction is fine for utility and municipality programs, is there a decent software, built to motivate homeowners, that identifies the instant value of comfort, health and improved lifestyle from energy improvements?

I think that is where the skill & care of the home analyst come into play. Those factors you mention are how I sell jobs, the energy efficiency is usually just a convenient side effect. I think the main purpose of a home analysis is to have enough data for the homeowner to make appropriate decisions regarding their priorities. If I find a water heater spilling CO everywhere, I don't want to tighten the home before addressing that health concern. In my view, health always trumps everything, and depending on the client, comfort usually trumps energy efficiency.

 

I don't know of any software that could effectively tell me why I'm cold by my crappy old windows, but a knowledgeable expert in my home who cares about me could explain the phenomena of radiant heat transfer and convective loops.

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