I assume it is because Windows no longer supports the old version of Internet Explorer that we use here at work, and to possibly work on mobile devices, but the appearance of the Home Energy Pros website on my computer is awful. The Home Energy Pro site looks "okay" on my phone, but I miss the open and friendly look of the original HEP website.

Is anyone else having the same issues?

Jim White

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Looks fine on IE 11 - time to upgrade your computers?

Firefox 31.00 no longer shows backgrounds or images.

I'm looking at Home Energy Pros now on Firefox 31.0 and it looks fine. Try refreshing.

It appears that a Plugin called HTTPS Everywhere was stopping some of the content in my case.

I stopped using Firefox -- too many glitches

Hi Jim, I wonder if you should switch browsers. Home Energy Pros looks good on Chrome, Firefox and Safari.

We currently use Internet Explorer version 8.0. It will be updated later today to version 11. That should fix the problem.

Awesome!

Although I updated to Internet Explorer 11, it looks like I am stuck with an ugly layout of Home Energy Pros. According to our network administrators, the Home Energy Pros website is being significantly blocked by our corporate firewall because of plug-ins from Facebook and Ning. Normally, our firewall will just block the Facebook portions of a website, but in this case our firewall is blocking ALL of the images and Java script from the site. Sigh.

James, Home Energy Pros runs on the Ning platform. Is it possible for your corporate firewall to make an exception for Ning?

Try downloading Google Chrome web browser

https://www.google.com/chrome/browser/

I had similar problems with different sights.

Sure if I pestered the web masters they would make the sight compatible.

I tried Chrome as a work around, it quickly became my favorite browser. I am not going back to IE.

Walta 

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