I'd  like input from installers out there on the best way you have found for securing foam baffle extensions to the underside of the roof deck. What works without tearing the foam. Low pitched roofs  are difficult to get to the eaves in the first place. Staples go through the foam.

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I'm sure there are different tricks and this is not my specialty, but when needed I use an electric stapler so I can position it, fire and not damage the foam.  The hammer staplers run out of room quickly and do cut the foam.  In extremely tight places I have stapled to the end I can reach and stuffed some batt insulation into the lower area to hold the baffle in place.  The batt insulation also blocks any blown-in insulation from reaching the soffits.  If I were to do one today, I would definitely not use fiberglass as the batt, but mineral wool such as Roxul.  Much denser and will block wind washing from the soffits.

 

Bud

Bud, Thanks for the suggestion. This is always a troublesome area to work in to begin with.

Ed

You might consider switching to a diffrent type of baffle depending on the job - generally an electric stapler and / or foam - I would love to find an electric cap stapler but haven't seen one yet / haven't needed to look that hard for one yet

I am not a big fan of batts as they can get blown into the soffit area & allow for insulation to get past.

http://blog.sls-construction.com/2011/air-sealing-attic-baffles

Sean-------I've often thought of using button caps also. What are your thoughts on using wire insulation stays such as Tigerclaws to hold the baffle in place? The difficult part of putting in baffles using a stapler is holding the baffle in place in while positioning the stapler to tack it.
The only Tigerclaw I know is the hidden deck fasntner system & I don't see that working - but your wire insulation stays does have some merit and I might have to try that seeing we occasioanlly have to secure wires so the gun is handy. Thanks
Sean--- Sorry about the Tigerclaw referance. I meant to say tiger tooth.
Ahh got you, that is not something we use, but it might work as long as it holds it tight, maybe two to prevent any rotation issues

I'd suggest buying sturdier plastic ones. Martin Holladay gave a comprehensive list of mfrs. at:

http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/community/forum/energy-efficien...

ADO products was making one w/ a wind wash block built in at 90 degree angle - not sure if they still do.

 

Alternatively, use a hammer tacker  and don't swing so hard.

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