Is any one familiar with the Peak Energy Saver from www.peakenergytech.com  The unit is intended to store energy from motors used in the home and then supply the stored energy back to the home, thus reducing consumption.  Clames to reduce energy consumption between 10% and 25%.   Fact or Fiction, does any one know?   

Thanks PJ Stevens 

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Power Factor devices do not work from an ROI perspective in homes because of the billing structure of many utility companies for residential dwellings.  These devices are better suited for commercial applications.

It should be said that most homes wouldn't benefit.  The home at the end of a rural system where losses become a real factor may benefit.  The device does work though.

If these devices were actually cost effective don't you think appliance manufacturers would use them OEM? HVAC manufacturers could use them on compressor motors. I would think it would be an easy way to get an extra 10% -25% efficiency IF they worked, problem is they don't.

Fiction. These guys appear every year with a different story. Once they get sued they change the name. You can get one of these on E-bay for under $200 if you want to prove it doesn't work.

I did see a demo of this system recently. Classic KVAR scam. They claim now that reducing current on the neutral conductor is proof of "recycling" energy. Its a new pitch and they had a few people at their booth. It is only a new variation of a classic scam.

Paul,

Fiction. Fraudulent is another good word.

This is another in a long-line of power factor "black box" scams.  Another manufacturer, KVAR, is particularly egregious, preying on gullible homeowners.

Note that there are always testimonials and never third party testing. That's because third party testing (pre/post) would expose that these don't save anything appreciable, particularly in homes.

Previous post here:

http://homeenergypros.lbl.gov/profiles/blogs/beware-of-power-factor

Some additional background here: http://michaelbluejay.com/electricity/powerfactor.html

Danny Parker

Likely snake oil

Sounds like yet another variation on notorious power factor correction devices

It is looking like a good deal, but I am sorry to say that I do not know about this and I am curious to find more about this. Thank you for taking our attention to this. I am going to find out more and will be back here with detail information, but I think this is not fake and looks quite possible.

Joe,

You are kidding, right?

Unless your utility bills you for low power factor (I've not seen one that does for residential) this device will save no money. On commercial applications a simple capacitor wired across the motor leads or power line is what is used to correct power factor.

I sure as heck agree with all the statements about the deceptive 'pitch' on this kind of device.  Do they have any application in residential solar applications?  Just wondering.

By residential solar, you mean Photo Voltaic I will assume, where the energy from the sun is converted to electric power. The conversion is to DC, direct current, for which power factor is not applicable. There is a second device, called an inverter, which converts the DC to Alternating Current (AC) usually with a power factor of 1.0 so the power can be "net metered" back to the utility at the highest possible tariff. There is one company here in California, named Altira or XET which claims a benefit from power factor correction on solar panels. You can read more in the fraud case filed by Googling "XET lawsuit." The assertion is that XET used this scheme to defraud investors of over four million dollars. BTW this issue of Power Factor Correction is not new. It was seen as a huge problem by Thomas Edison, and billing by kWh was solved when Elihu Thomson invented his meter around 1857. Here is a link with a lot more information: http://www.peakdemandautomation.com/power-factor-correction.html

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