Our local utility is offering a $350 energy audit' for $50. I've done some reading on here and already have fixed some issues with my 1600 sq ft house built in 2000. Combined gas/electric bill currently averages about $150/mo for a family of 4. I do not own a thermal imaging gun or a blower door, would it be worth the $50 to have them come do the blower door/thermal imaging?


Views: 1311

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I'm with Eugene on this ethics issue. Looking for work while inside the house, ostensibly to help the client, and then pretending to offer unbiased truth about the situation which one finds in a home seems like carrying water on both shoulders.

It stinks a bit of selfishness dressed up in an energy auditor suit. Better to stay true to the mission of telling, not selling. Discover, inform, check for understanding, and walk away. Call them back that night to ask if they have thought of any questions about what you found, but DON'T even try to go for the wallet. It scums up your words and the mission of helping them see when you turn cheap. Chances are that this kind of behavior will sour people on our profession. I know it's done all over, but I think it's unethical and I'm sure the homeowner feels this way too.


While I agree that the person performing the audit should be trained, qualified and certified, just because that auditor happens to be employed by a utility does not make the auditor untrustworthy.  I happen to be a certified auditor in the Member Service department and an electric cooperative.  We offer $150, full-blown audits to our members.  Blower door, thermal imaging, leakage testing, full report presented to the homewoner, AND a post audit performed showing the improvements. It would be no different than having a 3rd party audit performed, except for the cost.  I'm sure that is where the negative comments on this forum are derived from.  I apologize if we big, bad utility guys are cutting into a private auditor's business, but that's part of the advantage of belonging to a co-op.   

We DO NOT secretly bill the member additional costs in any shape of form.  I'm not sure where you get that information, but I can tell you honestly that cooperatives operate much differently than a private electric utility.  We are non-profit.  We work hard to maintain lower rates and we GIVE our members many perks, such as discounted, credible residential audits.



  • Add Videos
  • View All


Latest Activity

Benny hani replied to Benny hani's discussion Manual J online
"Thanks Bob"
44 minutes ago
Benny hani replied to Benny hani's discussion Manual J online
"Thank you Isaac"
45 minutes ago
Bob Blanchette commented on Amber Vignieri's blog post Even with Polar Vortex, Hourly Pricing Participants Saved
"Looks like the days of paying a fixed amount per KWh are rapidly coming to an end. Many utilities…"
2 hours ago
Bob Blanchette replied to Benny hani's discussion Manual J online
"Be sure the size that you ACCURATELY calculate actually gets installed. Often…"
2 hours ago
Bob Blanchette replied to Sean Lintow Sr's discussion Water Saver or Gimmick? in the group Best Practices (Residential)
"The problem is these devices NEVER pay for themselves. Water is cheap, about $3 per 1,000 gallons…"
2 hours ago
Bud Poll replied to Rob Madden's discussion Blower Door Testing on Energy Star v3 home
"Where was the blower set up, front door, other?  Was if located in an unobstructed area, not a…"
14 hours ago
David N. Armington liked John Poole's discussion Two Part Epoxy and Repair of Structural Wood
David N. Armington joined John Poole's group

Historic Home

Historic and vintage homes are significant to our cultural heritage, yet often lack energy…See More

© 2016   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service