Faced with Home Manager retirement, what should a homeowner do? Know your House Facts.  By design, “Variable Air Volume” is the foundation of your house mechanical systems sizing, ducts, sensors and electronic controllers which optimize comfort and operating efficiency.


Know your House Facts:  House “Characteristics" with Home Manager and VAV method. -



1) HVAC ducts are designed for multi-zone VAV operation.
2) HVAC ducts are over-sized by design to work optimally in a VAV system.
3) HVAC ducts are not equipped with "balancing" dampers since VAV is “self-balancing.”
4) By design VAV may have fewer air supply registers in room/area than conventional systems.
5) VAV method monitors temperature in each room/area (not average temperature in a hallway).
6) VAV method heats/cools specific areas per specific requirement. (cools gym, not her office).
7) VAV method adjusts according to active solar loads  (if South too hot or North too cool).
8) VAV delivers both personalized comfort and house-wide efficiency harmoniously.
9) VAV efficiency permits reducing 1 ton of capacity under Title 24, saving on initial costs.

Abandoning your designed VAV method will revert your house to a non-zoned configuration. Be aware this will affect your house comfort, efficiency and energy costs.

Know your House Facts: House “Characteristics" without Home Manager and VAV method. -

1) Cost of HVAC operations will increase at least 30%.
2) Longer average time required for areas to reach desired temperature comfort levels.
3) Some areas will not reach desired temperature under certain internal and solar loads.
4) Some areas will overshoot desired comfort temperature levels causing hot/cold spots.
5) First floor comfort temperature determined by a single sensor (or thermostat).
6) Second floor comfort temperature determined by single sensor (or thermostat).
7) Cooling one bedroom cools all bedrooms.  (Like controlling room lights from breaker box.)
8) Solar loads (East/South/West) create uneven temperatures (too hot/cold) in daylight hours.
9) Reduced tonnage capacity (per VAV design) insufficient for highest heat/cool demand.

HouseWide Utiliti

"My home, better served."

            Contact HouseWide by email at: support@HouseWide.net

Tags: HVAC, Home, VAV, automation

Views: 3392

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

It's hard enough to get homeowners to buy complete systems instead of just doing a condenser swap, much less buying an expensive VAV system. What is the difference between VAV and conventional zoning?

The Home Manager multi-zone controller operates the "Direct Air" VAV method, not a bypass method as in conventional residential zoning. The "Direct Air" VAV method introduced in 1985 is proven to be efficient and effective. However, the Home Manager electronic controller is reaching end of serviceable life leading some owners to abandon VAV and revert to conventional or non-zoned HVAC configurations. The article "Know Your House Facts" informs owners and contractors of the benefits of maintaining and draw backs of abandoning their homes existing VAV method. I believe bypass method is now banned for new or expanded residential zone control systems under California 2013 Title 24 regulation.

So VAV is just a zoned system that doesn't use a bypass damper? If the ducts were oversized at the time of initial installation a conventional zoned system wouldn't need a bypass damper either. I never understood the whole bypass damper thing, it defeats the whole point of saving energy with a zoned system. It's much better to set up a zoned system where the zones that aren't calling are opened a little bit to relieve excess static pressure. Better yet just go with separate systems for each floor...

Are you suggesting homeowners replace the control module but keep the rest of the system? Is there a current module compatible with the 30year old system? Is it proprietary or can it be controlled with a conventional zone controller?

RSS

Featured Forum Discussions

Too many BTU's. Too much horsepower?

Started by Steve in General Forum. Last reply by Eric Kjelshus on Saturday. 4 Replies

Stack/wind pressure and flow networks.

Started by Daniel James Grundy in Training. Last reply by Daniel James Grundy Mar 23. 5 Replies

BDT with vermiculite in hollow CMU walls?

Started by Brad Cook in General Forum. Last reply by John Nicholas Mar 23. 2 Replies

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Latest Activity

Sy Richardson's video was featured

Energy Efficient Roofing & 200 MPH Wind Rated

EternaTile delivers the easiest roof to install while delivering energy efficiency, aesthetics and up to 200 MPH sustained wind resistance. Watch how easy it is to install an EternaTile roof.
7 minutes ago
Gary Reed is now a member of Home Energy Pros
2 hours ago
Sy Richardson posted a video

Energy Efficient Roofing & 200 MPH Wind Rated

EternaTile delivers the easiest roof to install while delivering energy efficiency, aesthetics and up to 200 MPH sustained wind resistance. Watch how easy it is to install an EternaTile roof.
4 hours ago
Jacob Corvidae commented on Home Energy Magazine's blog post The Elephant in the Room
"Great story, Jim (and Kara).  For anyone interested in training on engaging with…"
5 hours ago
Tom Phillips commented on Home Energy Magazine's blog post The Elephant in the Room
"Great reminder! How do we get more contractors to visit their legislators? Related info from state…"
6 hours ago
Tom Phillips liked Home Energy Magazine's blog post The Elephant in the Room
7 hours ago
Jose Macho replied to Rob Madden's discussion Energy auditing as a stand-alone business model...
"Energy auditing as a stand alone business is not a sustainable business model. The biggest factor…"
7 hours ago
tedkidd replied to Rob Madden's discussion Energy auditing as a stand-alone business model...
"Oh, we are also finding EVERY effort towards radical transparency accelerates achievement of trust…"
7 hours ago

Home Energy Pros

Welcome to Home Energy Pros – the unique digital community by and for those who work in the home energy performance arena.

Home Energy Pros was founded by the developers of Home Energy Saver Pro (supported by the U.S. Department of Energy) and brought to you in partnership with Home Energy magazine.  Home Energy Pros is sponsored by the Better Buildings Residential Network. Please honor our Guidelines

© 2017   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service