Are there suggestions out there as to the best way to insulate newly installed speakers!  I have been working to improve the  tightness of my 22 year old home but after that big effort, I installed 10 speakers in 5 rooms.  This, as one might suspect, has resulted in several holes leading from unconditioned spaces to conditioned spaces. Some folks say just drape insulation over the new speakers while other say build a box to protect the innards of the speakers from fiber glass, dust, etc. The latter is supposed to enhance the quality of the music emanating from the speakers but there are many opinions out there!

Views: 20942

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

From techstreet -- holder of some of the UL documents.... about UL-1715

"This test method is intended for use in the evaluation of the flammability contribution of wall materia l assemblies, ceiling material assemblies, or both, exposed to early fire growth under specified room fir e exposure conditions. The effectiveness of fire barrier materials as protection for other combustible materials or components within the assembly is of primary interest for this evaluation."

The point of suggesting to look for UL1715 and the ASTM numbers is that it might be that other good building materials would be found that could do a better job for John.  That was the reason for suggesting keywords for searches.

The Tenmat hats themselves provide the flame spread,  the fire stop foams/sealants, just cover the cases where flames might seep under the hats and into the attic.   They also stop the hats from rattling and dancing around in the attic when loud rock and roll is played  :-)

good point on the dancing. 

my only concern is that folks dont get the impression there are fire safe foam's out there.  if you ignite an piece of FS 25 foam and take the flame source away, the foam will self extinguish.  But, the tech data sheets the foam manufacturers provide will have footnotes saying their foam requires a 15 minute thermal barrier between the foam and the people.  that's becasue foam has a low self ignition temperaturte, and it is very good at holding heat in.  it doesn't take long for foam to burn when it is exposed to heat in excess of 450 degrees. 

RSS

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Twitter

Latest Activity

George Matthews replied to George Matthews's discussion Shortridge 8400 Flowhood for A/C airflow testing in the group Energy Auditing Equipment for Sale, Trade or to Purchase
"Here are the pics of the flowhood and airdata manometer"
22 hours ago
Sarah Holloway posted a photo
yesterday
Joe Urycki added a discussion to the group Energy Auditing Equipment for Sale, Trade or to Purchase
Thumbnail

TEC blower door and UEI combustion analyzer for sale

For sale is one used TEC Minneapolis blower door system: Includes model 3 fan with rings A and B,…See More
yesterday
John Nicholas replied to Kevin Emerson's discussion Studies re: radon mitigation and energy efficiency
"The Nay side is well represented with the links already posted. I presented a neutral side, with…"
yesterday
Ray Lehman replied to Kevin Emerson's discussion Studies re: radon mitigation and energy efficiency
"Hey John, Thanks for the information.  Very good empirical data. While I agree that running…"
yesterday
John Nicholas replied to Kevin Emerson's discussion Studies re: radon mitigation and energy efficiency
"I have no links, just some anecdotal evidence. I had several Blower Door Tests done on my own home.…"
yesterday
Chris Laumer-Giddens commented on Chris Laumer-Giddens's blog post Raising the BARrier in North Carolina Mountain Home, Air Tight Ceiling
"@Joe Nagan, We have found this technique to be WAY simpler and A LOT less labor than making a…"
Thursday
Judy Rachel replied to Blake Shurtz's discussion Testing spillage on induced draft furnace?
"I hope the attached picture is clear enough for you to see.  As the caption on the picture…"
Thursday

© 2016   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service