HELP - AIR SEALING a Continuous Stone Interior/ Exterior Wall

I just recently audited a home that had a blower door number of 11,684 CFM50 and/or 11.81 ACH50. And of course one of the main air infiltration culprits was a stone face wall that was continuous on the outside and inside of the building envelope. The basics as I see it is this: the 1/4" stone joints allow air to freely flow into the house.

Does anyone know of any good methods to seal a high-end stone wall air leakage like this? 


Below are some photos:

PHOTO OF HOUSE Stone Wall Located Bottom Right

CLOSEUP PHOTO OF HOUSE Stone Wall / Back Exterior Door (OUTSIDE)

INFRARED/ ACTUAL Stone Wall/ Back Exterior Door (INSIDE)


Views: 3862

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Try log cabin chinking.

Air sealing a wall like this must be done with a vapor diffusive material or you will get spalled stone faces from sealing materials holding water. I recommend mixing hydrated lime with local clay soils, this is the way they have been sealed for millenia. Vapor open and beautiful. Do not use cement based products to fill the gaps as these are not vapor diffusive.

I've drilled wood window and door jambs on double wythe brick walls and then dense packed.  Helped a lot.  Dunno if that applies to your job.

Lots of interesting ideas.  Typically in the North East we would have just skinned stone on a masonry wall. You could mortar the joints. Obviously you could seal it an close it.  I would seal it with open cell spray foam, Keep the permeability between 3 and 10 perm.  Then air space and interior surface, like green board on steel or timber studs.

I hate to cover it.  The answer for the 100 year old stone foundation in a cheap farm house would be drylock on well prepared surface.

I liked the suggestion to look elsewhere.  You know where the air is coming in, so try to stop the air getting out.  Also, put some nice french doors inside these doors to separate this space from the rest of the house.  Obviously large open vertical columns of air, create their own motivating pressure.  But if you can seal the top, it will slow the infiltration in the bottom. 



  • Add Videos
  • View All


Latest Activity

Benny hani replied to Benny hani's discussion Manual J online
"Thanks Bob"
15 hours ago
Benny hani replied to Benny hani's discussion Manual J online
"Thank you Isaac"
15 hours ago
Bob Blanchette commented on Amber Vignieri's blog post Even with Polar Vortex, Hourly Pricing Participants Saved
"Looks like the days of paying a fixed amount per KWh are rapidly coming to an end. Many utilities…"
17 hours ago
Bob Blanchette replied to Benny hani's discussion Manual J online
"Be sure the size that you ACCURATELY calculate actually gets installed. Often…"
17 hours ago
Bob Blanchette replied to Sean Lintow Sr's discussion Water Saver or Gimmick? in the group Best Practices (Residential)
"The problem is these devices NEVER pay for themselves. Water is cheap, about $3 per 1,000 gallons…"
17 hours ago
Bud Poll replied to Rob Madden's discussion Blower Door Testing on Energy Star v3 home
"Where was the blower set up, front door, other?  Was if located in an unobstructed area, not a…"
David N. Armington liked John Poole's discussion Two Part Epoxy and Repair of Structural Wood
David N. Armington joined John Poole's group

Historic Home

Historic and vintage homes are significant to our cultural heritage, yet often lack energy…See More

© 2016   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service