HELP - AIR SEALING a Continuous Stone Interior/ Exterior Wall

I just recently audited a home that had a blower door number of 11,684 CFM50 and/or 11.81 ACH50. And of course one of the main air infiltration culprits was a stone face wall that was continuous on the outside and inside of the building envelope. The basics as I see it is this: the 1/4" stone joints allow air to freely flow into the house.

Does anyone know of any good methods to seal a high-end stone wall air leakage like this? 

Thanks.

Below are some photos:

PHOTO OF HOUSE Stone Wall Located Bottom Right

CLOSEUP PHOTO OF HOUSE Stone Wall / Back Exterior Door (OUTSIDE)

INFRARED/ ACTUAL Stone Wall/ Back Exterior Door (INSIDE)

INTERIOR WALL - INFRARED / ACTUAL



Views: 3741

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Try log cabin chinking.

Air sealing a wall like this must be done with a vapor diffusive material or you will get spalled stone faces from sealing materials holding water. I recommend mixing hydrated lime with local clay soils, this is the way they have been sealed for millenia. Vapor open and beautiful. Do not use cement based products to fill the gaps as these are not vapor diffusive.

I've drilled wood window and door jambs on double wythe brick walls and then dense packed.  Helped a lot.  Dunno if that applies to your job.

Lots of interesting ideas.  Typically in the North East we would have just skinned stone on a masonry wall. You could mortar the joints. Obviously you could seal it an close it.  I would seal it with open cell spray foam, Keep the permeability between 3 and 10 perm.  Then air space and interior surface, like green board on steel or timber studs.

I hate to cover it.  The answer for the 100 year old stone foundation in a cheap farm house would be drylock on well prepared surface.

I liked the suggestion to look elsewhere.  You know where the air is coming in, so try to stop the air getting out.  Also, put some nice french doors inside these doors to separate this space from the rest of the house.  Obviously large open vertical columns of air, create their own motivating pressure.  But if you can seal the top, it will slow the infiltration in the bottom. 

RSS

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Twitter

Latest Activity

Eve Dunham replied to Kim Tanner's discussion Facebook page targeting and privacy in the group Marketing Energy Efficiency
"I have used the targeted ads feature for age, location, etc. I have had moderate success with this.…"
45 minutes ago
Home Energy Magazine's blog post was featured
19 hours ago
Hannah Finch posted a blog post
19 hours ago
Profile Iconpank and Carrie Sturrock joined Home Energy Pros
19 hours ago
tedkidd commented on Amber Vignieri's blog post Chicago Winter No Match for Retrofitted Logan Square Building
"This case study is an example of how hard it is simply to do a compelling case study. Everyone has…"
21 hours ago
B. M. Lubin posted an event
Thumbnail

GPRO Construction Management Class at USGBC-LI headquarters in Hauppauge, NY at USGBC-LI Headquarters

September 19, 2016 at 9am to September 20, 2016 at 2pm
Taught by industry experts using real-life classroom exercises, GPRO CM gives experienced building…See More
yesterday
B. M. Lubin is now a member of Home Energy Pros
yesterday
Eric Kjelshus replied to tedkidd's discussion Dear DOE, PACE sucks - please fix or make it go away...
"Most HVAC system upgrade - change outs and attic seals-R-49 end up $20-30K   Most house -…"
yesterday

© 2016   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service