I've been doing HP assessments for 12 years, but find myself a little limited in my knowledge of this issue.

Here's the scenario: I do an initial assessment where I find a 7-year old NG water heater with 1500 ppm undiluted CO. The homeowner brings in his plumber to "fix" it. The plumber, who doesn't own a CO monitor, cleans the burner and air intake grill, and proclaims it good. After work is done on the home, I re-test and find the CO to be even higher this time, and the draft weak.

What typically can be done to a fairly new water heater to fix the CO problem? The gas/air ratio must be out of wack, I'm thinking. Is it usually corrected by replacing the gas control valve?

The homeowner is left hanging, the plumber is without a clue and me telling him it needs to be corrected. I would recommend a different plumber, but I want to find out what a knowledgeable individual would typically do to correct this, short of replacing it. One thing I know is I need to align with a knowledgeable person to address this in the future.

John Shillito

Tags: CO, heater, plumber, water

Views: 648

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I have to agree with Kurt. 2000 ppm is exceedingly high. I have tested hundreds of hot water heater (NG, Oil) and mostly they come in around 16 ppm. There is clearly something wrong and we all know that a gas hot water draft can easily be compromised. 

hey thanks for the links. Very informative on FVIR units

Hello John (and everyone else in the forum),

I'm a new visitor at this forum and it this is my first post. I look forward to more sharing and learning in the future.

The first condition that I would investigate the "weak draft". Is the flame lazy too? Is the equipment in place the same as what the flue was originally designed for?

I find the best place to contact when at a loss is the manufacturer's technical support.

Steve

RSS

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Twitter

Latest Activity

Chris Laumer-Giddens posted a blog post

Building with Rocks, Rocks. Check out the Drying Potential

Building with Rocks, Rocks! Check out the Drying Potential.Check this out! This 24" x 48" x 2"…See More
1 hour ago
Evan Mills's blog post was featured

Looking Back and Looking Forward: Home Energy Pros at 5 and 5000

Over the past five years, the Home Energy Pros social network has grown from a twinkle in our eyes…See More
7 hours ago
Profile IconJACK and Noah Ray Sanders joined Home Energy Pros
8 hours ago
Eve Dunham joined Diane Chojnowski's group
Thumbnail

News & Announcements

Share your news and announcements with the community in this group.To post news or an announcement,…See More
8 hours ago
Eve Dunham joined Tom White's group
Thumbnail

Weatherization

Share your concerns and successes as a weatherization professional, or information for this…See More
8 hours ago
Eve Dunham joined allen p tanner's group
Thumbnail

Energy Auditing Equipment for Sale, Trade or to Purchase

Discuss the pros and cons of the equipment you are interested in prior to purchase. Post equipment…See More
8 hours ago
Eve Dunham joined James Sayers's group
Thumbnail

Marketing Energy Efficiency

Sharing ideas, tools and examples of promoting energy efficiency to consumersSee More
8 hours ago
Eve Dunham joined A. Tamasin Sterner's group
Thumbnail

Dear Occupant:

What conditions were present when a customer had an Aha moment?  What made the communication…See More
8 hours ago

© 2016   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service