I'm asked to estimate the heating energy savings from air sealing a 10,000 sf house built in 1900. The former mansion has 6 undampered chimneys and about 40 windows needing repair as well as doors, some needing replacement and all needing weatherstripping. The house has a semi heated basement, and three stories on top of it.

The house has new radiators in all rooms and a 92% efficient boiler.

How do I estimate the potential heating savings from all the air sealing possible here?

George Matthews

 

Views: 306

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

"A Journey of a Thousand Miles starts with a single step."

Try breaking the house into smaller pieces and working on the "knowns" first.

The most accurate way would be to have a blower door test conducted.  Once you know how much infiltration you have you should be able to determine the total energy waste associated with that air infiltration.

The Retrotec blower door manual has this chart for estimating the energy wasted due to air leakage. This should help you.

David,

Thanks! That is exactly the information I needed to make sense of the blower door data.

Now I need to learn how to estimate the potential energy savings from changing out a 23 y.o. boiler that was 80% efficient when new. The replacement would be a 95% boiler potentially coupled with solar hot water. There are 25 people here who take showers daily.

 

Also, I've read about heat exchangers to recapture waste heat from the pipes running from showers. "EcoDrain" is one such unit. Does anyone have experience with these? And if so what type of efficiencies are they finding?

George,

If you know the annual fuel heating energy bill you can make an estimate. If you know the cost per therm of natural gas or per gallon of fuel oil you can estimate the total amount of energy required.  For example, for a 80% efficient propane unit and if we assume 340 gallons of propane for heating...
340 * 91,300 * 0.8 = 24.8 MMBTU produced.  We then divide this by 0.95 and 91300 for the new boiler to get 286 gallons required for the new furnace. (91300 is the # of BTU's in 1 gal of propane).  I hope you see my logic...  Or just divide .8 by .95 to get the ratio of new energy required (84%), 16% less energy.

RSS

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Twitter

Latest Activity

Rob Madden, Solar Home Broker joined Leslie McDowell, BPI's group
Thumbnail

Building Performance Institute (BPI)

BPI is the nation's premier standards development, quality assurance and credentialing organization…See More
4 hours ago
Rob Madden, Solar Home Broker posted a discussion

Indoor Air Quality Monitors and Meters

I'm considering purchasing the AirAdvice for Homes indoor air quality monitor but it seems to have…See More
5 hours ago
Rob Madden, Solar Home Broker joined Sean Lintow Sr's group
Thumbnail

Best Practices (Residential)

Best Building, Retrofitting, or even Auditing Practices - what are they, what should change, what…See More
6 hours ago
Nate Adams replied to Diane Chojnowski's discussion Poll: How confident do you feel about the future of home performance?
"Matt Golden commented on a parody video "Single Pane" a few months back that the 9 year…"
9 hours ago
tedkidd replied to Diane Chojnowski's discussion Poll: How confident do you feel about the future of home performance?
"Words are jargon until they become common. They become common when they refer to something…"
10 hours ago
Evan Mills replied to Diane Chojnowski's discussion Poll: How confident do you feel about the future of home performance?
"Not too surprising that "home performance" is unfamiliar jargon to the average citizen…"
15 hours ago
Craig McManus added a discussion to the group Job Board
Thursday
Chris Heenan replied to Luis Hernandez's discussion ERV Configuration
"Can you use…"
Thursday

© 2016   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service