Empirical evidence that missing refrigerant suction line insulation decreases efficiency therefore increasing energy costs.

  Does anyone have any access to actual dollar figures for the cost of missing/ torn/ broken refrigerant suction line insulation? 

 For the program I am involved with we are trying to provide evidence that there is a significant cost increase that related to diminished/ broken/ missing suction line insulation that will make the repair show up as a cost effective repair or replacement.

Anything general or specific that could aid us in this research would be greatly appreciated.

Tags: Cost, Suction, effective, flash, gas, insulation, line, point, refrigerant, repairs

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Some have claimed insulating the high and low side lines together has helped reduce high side pressure, but the jury is still out on how much energy it saves.

Very good question.Last week I attended a seminar on the Internation energy conservation codes.One of the changes was increasing insulation by one inch on the high side.There may be some more info on it if you search IECC building codes?Section 403 and IRC sectionM1401.3,good luck.Keep us posted

The first part is simple - not that are legitimate as it does depend on the unit, where it is located,conditions & how much the unit it is used - though you might be able to find a % figure that might work for you. As for having a cost reason to fix something damaged, worn out, etc... that is a big issue IMHO - some items (and I am not saying that this is one) should just be listed as mandatory like air sealing before you add more insulation into an attic, etc...

The consensus is that we should insulate it for numerous reasons, however, without the actual dollar figure metric to install in the NEAT library, it only cuts down on the allowable expense that goes toward some other measures.

Thanks everyone for the info, keep it coming! 

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