Does anyone have any experience with an Owens Corning product called "Energy Complete" ?

I am interested in any comments about this product, pros and cons.
Does this product have a future as a hybrid insulating system for new construction, or is it to expensive to compete with a caulk gun or other methods?
Thanks
Mark

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Robert,

The OC energycomplete can not be sprayed with any paint sprayer. Its a 2 part foam 4to 1 it needs 2 pumps one is bigger then other in order to get correct ration. It also has a special gun. The Knauf Ecoseal you can use a paint sprayer they do recommend specific sprayers since the psi has to be quite high.

Knauf has a competing product called EcoSeal - http://bit.ly/lWYOZT

I know a contractor who just started using this.  It goes on with an airless sprayer.  The homes he has installed it in haven't even been completed yet.  I will get more info from him re pricing, etc.

Hey Silas,

 

thanks for the link.  Please keep me advised as more information from that contractor develops.

The product looks interesting.

Mark

I am also a certified installer of the energy Complete System based out of St. Louis.  Like many other s have said this system i great for minimizing the unwanted air flow into a home and through the insulation itself.  

Very recently Owens Corning has released a new tip for the systems spray gun that reduces wasted product by 50%. The new BEADED EXTRUSION tip allows the product to go only where it is intended to both air seal and still create the same air gasket effect as with the previous three inch band.

Owens Corning has been great with continuing to develop the system.

I spoke with a builder who has tried both the Owens product and the Knauf product.  

They quit using Owen. It sprays on and bubbles up a little. He couldnt get a good surface for the drywall to sit on. I cant remember all the particulars but he was not satisfied. It is not recommended for use with cellulose.

The builder switched to the Knauf and his mock up showed very neat crisp lines. along double studs or top plates they we tooled smooth with the face of the wood so the drywall would sit flush. 

Both Owens and Knauf have videos on their sites.

I can agree that the Owens Corning product can easily be applied too thick and create a problem for the drywallers but that problem is all in the installer not with the product.  Form personal experience it takes a few tries to get good at the application.  We actually used it to air seal a retrofit attic twice in order to practice getting the correct thickness.  Once we had that down we have not had any complaints from new construction jobs.

Did you happen to perform a blower door on the retrofit application? How did it stick in a dusty attic? This is what I am most interested in. I am wondering how it performs in retro environment. I can get the Knauf Eco-Seal at a reasonable price and already have spray equipment that is sufficient. I want to start using it to air seal attics in retro. Two part foam is just too expensive for air sealing. I can my material costs on half on a full attic air seal.

the EC foam is not the ideal product to use in Retro fit attics... we used it a few times for the simple reason of we needed to learn the operation and application of the product before it really mattered.  In an attic covered with insulation it did not matter nearly as much how pretty the application was.  the best thing that i have found to air seal and attic is simple canned spray foam. It is light weight, portable and much less expensive to use than any machine.

I wonder about adhesion-and life cycle-as well; that is compared to the "foam".

Chemically, urethanes perform much better in terms of adhesion and movement; and therefore, have a longer life compared to latex. 

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