Does anyone have any experience with an Owens Corning product called "Energy Complete" ?

I am interested in any comments about this product, pros and cons.
Does this product have a future as a hybrid insulating system for new construction, or is it to expensive to compete with a caulk gun or other methods?
Thanks
Mark

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I havent used it on a job.  I attended a demo/training session with a distributor in CT.

It's basically something in between single part gun foam and two part spolyurethane foam.

Its thicker and stickier than gun foam, but less hazardous than 2-part poly.

It's latex based so is washes with water before curing.

For retro-fit work, I think 2-part poly does a better job of airsealing.

For new construction or remodelling this is an advantage when using Batt insulation.  For a low cost add-on, you can use this and then install Batt insulation properly and finally get decent performing envelope.  However, it's propietary to Owens corning and only availabel throught there exclusive distributors who get control over territories.

 

Oh and the sprayed product is extremely PINK - sublime advertising for O-C.

 

Anybody have on-the-job experience with this Owens Corning Energy Complete

Thanks Andrew,
I agree that it should do a great job when combined with a good insulation
Job. Hope to hear some good reviews.
Mark

I have seen it in use on one job and was under-whelmed by the actual installation.  The demo card shows a nice thick gasket-like application; what I observed was closet to paint, and left me doubting it would have the desired sealing between the framing and drywall.

Full Album: picasa album

Sample
 

Thanks AB,
I appreciate your opinion and the pics. It does look thin, and it also looks like they missed some areas.
The proof would be in the blower door test I guess.
Still trying to decide if it's worth the investment?
Mark
Mark, I am actualy a certified installer for Owens Corning. Im curently doing a Energy Star project in NY where we pass the blower door tests. Its a great product and you are absloutly right that the above picture has it sprayed wat to light. However this picture is from interior walls on the top floor that is sprayed in order to create a gasket to the attic. I will post some pictures of my jobs.
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This picture is intriguing.  Based on the apparent lack of detail on the fiberglass installation, it's amazing anyone bothered to care about air sealing, much less pay what is most likely a premium for this product.

It's difficult to tell exactly what I'm looking at, but I'm trying to figure out why they sprayed the top plate of an interior wall entering a closet...?  Is the insulation above sound attenuation between floors, or is that the attic insulation?  Do people still use batt insulation in attics?

This was a project that was supposed to be a demo, HQ project.  I think they made some mistakes and probably took on too much with little experience in EE building.  It falied the Thermal Bypass inspection for Energy Star and they did not make the corrections.

 

Spending time with a blower door and infrared camera, the seal between the top plate and drywall is an important area and hard to get.  I have a contractor who uses compressable gasket intended for doors and window replacement/retrofit along the lower top plate.  They have reduced their CFM50 by about 300, so it works.  This strategy (with the OC product or another) is important for all walls since air leakage from the attic happens at all walls.

 

Few people use batt insulation in attics around here....and this is a poor job.  In this location was for sound, but you can see the walls were installed with a similar low level of care.

 

I actualy wondered the same thing. The reaseon its sprayed on the top plate ofan interior wall, is as I mentioned in another post its to create a gasket to the attic. And to your question if people still use batt insulation in attics? Well I bet my business on that we do it every day. P.S. My insulation job doesnt look like that picture I will post one of my jobs. (its a 20' high grand foyer)
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That is a horrendous job of installing batts.  A perfect example of why I would never use batts.

If you look in the picture you see a thicker bead that sticks up from the framing.  Then at the top of the picture it is very thin.  I am betting it was sprayed very thin so as not to interfere with the drywall.  But at the same time I bet it is not thick enough to withstand expansion and contraction.

Mark,

 

I don't think it is intended to be used in a hybrid insulating system.  The tech data sheet doesn't seem to list an R-value and I can't find any suggestion that it be used in full coverage.  I would say that it is an air sealing material only. 

 

  If you think about it,  you have to buy a pretty expensive piece of equipment to apply this product.  It would be difficult to imagine it competing with canned foams or caulks which are very affordable.  On the other end, it could compete with spray foams but would suffer in comparison ebcause they can be used as both insulation and air sealant.

 

 

Scott Cummings

Dow Building Solutions

BPI Analyst/Envelope Professional

Hi Scott,

 

Thanks for your input.  I have read a lot about the product from OC, and Its not intended as a stand alone item.  It's considered a hybrid because it is used with blown in and or batt insulation.  It has a R value in the 3's when sprayed one inch thick, but that is not its' purpose.   It is supposed to do a better job than caulk and be quicker too.  It doesn't dry out and it can get hard to reach places better.  It is priced between caulk, at the bottom end, and SPF's at the top end.

It doesn't sound like it gets used much, and it looks to be because of the cost involved vs other methods.      Still looking for direct experience on the job with this product positive or negative????

Thanks again

Mark

 

 

Scott

Its a spray caulk to be used for air sealing. It is only meant to be applied at the seams.  It takes a $1500+ paint sprayer. Same for the Knauf Eco Seal.

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