Just looking for thoughts about sealing an attic that has HVAC equipment in it by using a netting product and dense packing cellulose in the rafters. I have seen this before, although I usually see it combined with foam on the roof deck.  Home is in southeastern Virginia, climate zone 4 and we traditionally do not insulate between the rafters, just the ceiling. The home in question has 85 can lights and we are looking at a cost effective way to eliminate the air flow through these bad boys.

 

Thanks

Views: 2145

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hey Brad,

My two cents,

1. Build some "hats" around the cans. look up can light tophats on the net. You can manufacture these 'hats' with drywall or sheet metal. I think the clearance from the cans is 3". Get a good system and fabricate. That is a lot of lights.

 

2. Seal the hell out of every duct joint that you you can get your hands on with mastic, including plenums.

 

3. wrap all duct work including returns, supply and plenums with FSK fiberglass...R-19..tape well.

 

4. plug all penetrations, bypasses in lid from attic.

 

5. blow loose fill cellulose or fiberglass to a minimum R-38.

 

If you blow rafters with netting your thermal boundary not be aligned (insulation + air barrier). You could pack into a plastic "netting" and possibly incur moisture liability.

 

there are my two cents....in this economy they are probably only worth one anyway.

 

please let me know what you come up with, as I am learning and would love to know what your solution is.

 

tim

 

 

 

 

 

The can lights are in the attic floor, you are asking about insulating the rafters, correct?
Yes, another weatherization company in my area has done this for a client I did an audit for.  I do not see the advantage in dense packing the rafters.
What size are the rafters? With cellulose insulation you are going to need to install baffles for ventilation of the roof deck, so take that into account as you figure the max R value you can achieve that way, and compare it with what you could do with loose fill on the attic floor. But, the wild card is the mechanical equipment and all those can lights, and it may be that overall higher efficiency can be had by turning this into a conditioned attic by insulating the roof. I believe it is more common to condition an attic by spray-foaming the roof, but it probably varies regionally.

At $4300, you could replace all of those lights with these:

http://www.lowes.com/pd_78215-3-70644_4294857050_4294937087_?produc...

They tend to leak very little and throw out a decent amount of light for LEDs.

And, over time, they would pay for themselves (not sure what that would be though, you do the math :-)

85 recessed lights seems a bit excessive... They might consider mudding over half of them and using task lights instead... sheesh.

It was a ton of lights.  Turns out the dense pack did not work.  Test in 2755cfm50, test out 4500cfm50

Me thinks something is wrong there

Me also thinks something is wrong there with your in and out tests. Baseline fluctuating from wind? That's a huge difference in readings. And with the dense pack, I would expect the test out to actually be lower rather than higher.

Brad, did you/they change anything with those lights, are they 85 leakier holes now?  And what did you do with the ventilation?

 

Bud

I am not involved in the project at this point.  I did the initial audit only and not the test out.  The WX contractor dense packed the rafters and did no other air sealing.  The homeowner wanted to expand the home into the attic and that is one reason that they dense packed.  So, the test out number is a bit misleading because they added about 1400 sq feet of "conditioned" space.  I have not been back to the house since they did this and my original concern was that it was not the best option for the homeowner.

 

Sounds like this is done, but for anyone interested, there is a much more cost effective solution to air seal all of these cans. Everyone talks about building a "box" over each can light...very labor intensive and on sloped roofs, very difficult access in many situations. There is a retrofit air tight trim that may be installed from the bottom. It is cone shape and has the gasket on the top where it clips into the socket, and the rim just gets caulked to the drywall. Simple. They are only $5 a piece and take 5  minutes to install. They are for 6" cans only and will not fit in a low profile can. Here is a link www.affordablequalitylighting.com/docs/indoor/recessed/6in120vstand... . That is the only place I have ever found these and I have done probably 300 lights and never built a drywall box in the attic. Combine them with a good quality R30 fluorescent and you can have a big savings package.

Craig, thanks much for that link to the retrofit trims! I've been looking for something like that for quite a while.

RSS

Featured Forum Discussions

What causes a temperature plane in a home

Started by Energy Wise Solutions in HVAC. Last reply by Peter Krych on Friday. 4 Replies

Velocity Pressure Testing

Started by Horace Douglas Hunt, Jr. in General Forum. Last reply by Horace Douglas Hunt, Jr. Apr 15. 2 Replies

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Latest Activity

Efficiency First California's blog post was featured

Building a Clean Energy Future, Respect for the People Who Will Build It

You don’t need to spend a great of time deal in the policy world before you hear a conversation…See More
3 hours ago
Efficiency First California posted a blog post

Building a Clean Energy Future, Respect for the People Who Will Build It

You don’t need to spend a great of time deal in the policy world before you hear a conversation…See More
21 hours ago
Profile IconDavid G. Tamutus and Sharon Block joined Home Energy Pros
22 hours ago
Gary Reed added a discussion to the group Job Board
Thumbnail

HOME ENERGY ADVISORS WANTED (NEW YORK STATE: Saratoga & Glens Falls Region)

We are currently seeking experienced HOME ENERGY ADVISEOS to join the Jack Hall Plumbing &…See More
yesterday
Profile IconGary Reed and Kurt Shafer joined Diane Chojnowski's group
Thumbnail

Job Board

This group is for posting jobs related to all aspects of the home performance industry including…See More
Monday
Ron Sarrick liked Energy Wise Solutions's discussion What causes a temperature plane in a home
Monday
Kurt Shafer added a discussion to the group Job Board
Thumbnail

Installers for Whole House Fans in Various Cities

Invisco Whole House Fan Company in Temecula CA sells the highest performance fans in history. The…See More
Monday
Kurt Shafer posted a blog post

First Rooftop Whole House Fan for Homes without Attics

Eichler was one of the most famous Mid Century Modern home builders in the 50s and 60s. His homes…See More
Monday

Home Energy Pros

Welcome to Home Energy Pros – the unique digital community by and for those who work in the home energy performance arena.

Home Energy Pros was founded by the developers of Home Energy Saver Pro (supported by the U.S. Department of Energy) and brought to you in partnership with Home Energy magazine.  Home Energy Pros is sponsored by the Better Buildings Residential Network. Please honor our Guidelines

© 2017   Created by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service