Does anyone else have any concerns over this?

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Over what exactly - the code process is involved of many groups who all have an interest. NAHB makes some valid arguments on some things, but others they love scaring people & running the numbers up. 42000 per house - nope not even close

Of course once the process is over, doesn't mean that it is over (for more on this & some of the above);

Sean , Thank you for that link. That is going to be vey helpful. I personally like the idea that my work provides more value than just energy related savings. This proves it. You know almost every work day I get the chance to refine my definition of Air Changes per Hour to someone. Until now I always thought uncontrolled air movement to be descriptive of salesmen and beer drinkers.

If anyone believes that increased insulation values by code are " a special interest groups "pushed agenda....well have another beer....     

The NAHB numbers really looked "cooked",  they will do a good job on their reputation if they are not extremely careful. The IEC 2012  is less restrictive than some state standards and it is certainly less restrictive than a Passive House  designed house.  Yet the Passive House folks are now able to show that the tighter standards add less than 5% to the total cost, while significantly reducing the annual energy use  and increasing the home value. The lower energy costs easily offset the slightly higher build costs.

Some of the NAHB items shown on their action plan are outcomes from NFPA  (fire / insurance) industries concerns.  Certainly if there is a problem with foam on the outside of the buildings in some fire prone regions - a larger setback might be wise -- but really it would probably make better sense to change the materials in that case and go away from foam on the outside of the building to the use of a rock wool insulation.

In the end the product will be bought by an individual wanting to live in a quality home.  If they water down the IEC2012 for the NAHB - I suspect NAHB members may also be seeing more lawsuits about false claims for the efficiency of "these" new NAHB "standard" houses.   People do travel around the world.  They do read newspapers, magazines, books and journals, and they would understand that houses built as the NAHB proposes MAY NOT be the most cost effective homes.   A builder that tries to use the NAHB views to promote their homes as the most efficient and cost effective homes would certainly be at a greater risk of suits if the home owners are then unhappy with the performance.....

Problem with their argument is that it's just not true. They tried that nonsense in Illinois and Maryland so far, and nobody bought it.  IL is now on the 2012, with automatic adoption of each new IECC within a year of publication.  Don't fret, but definitely be at the meetings where this stuff is discussed, so you can call bullshit.



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